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Grant seeks to reduce opioid deaths by 40 percent in Salem, Gloucester

SALEM — Boston Medical Center researchers are among four recipients to receive grant money from a federal research study aimed to cut opioid overdose deaths by 40 percent over the next three years.

As part of the $350 million grant, BMC was awarded $89 million in April and selected 16 communities across Massachusetts to participate in the study, including Salem and Gloucester.

North Shore Community Health, a patient-centered medical home with three family practice sites in Peabody, Salem and Gloucester, was chosen to be part of the study.

Margaret A. Brennan, MPH, President and CEO of North Shore Community Health, said she’s eager to get moving on this initiative with her team.

“Forty percent is aggressive, but I think it’s doable,” said Brennan, further describing the initiative as “daunting but exciting.”

Having worked with NSCH in the past, Brennan said BMC reached out and selected Salem and Gloucester to be two of the 16 communities.

For their long-term goal, Brennan said they’re on a mission to reduce the number of opioid-related deaths, specifically in the communities they serve.

More than 1 in 4 Massachusetts residents reported knowing someone who died from an opioid overdose, according to a survey from WBUR.

“I want to make a difference in this epidemic,” Brennan said. “I think we’ll get there.”

The primary concern right now for NSCH is to spread awareness of the work they’re doing and get more people engaged in care, as Brennan said they have the capacity.

Founded more than 40 years ago, NSCH serves more than 300 patients across three location sites, providing medical, dental and substance abuse treatment as well as behavioral health services.

Brennan said they also provide school-based health centers at Salem High School and Peabody Veterans Memorial High School, as well as behavioral health care at Collins Middle School, Nathaniel Bowditch School, Bates Elementary School and Bentley Academy Charter School.

Their office-based opioid treatment program, termed the MAT program, uses Suboxone medication to help fight opioid-withdrawal symptoms.

As of now, Brennan said it’s still to early to know what the grant money will be used for in Salem and Gloucester.

“We need to develop a robust model of care to help people get the treatment they need to get their lives back,” added Brennan. She said it’s still to early to know where the grant money will go in Salem and Gloucester.

Once plans are finalized over the following months, NSCH will have frequent check-ins. “We’ll need to demonstrate we’re making a difference,” she said. “It speaks volumes to how important this is to all of us. It’s got to stop.”

Drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in the U.S., which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention explains increased significantly in 2017 with more than 70,000 overdoses.

But as Brennan described, “The real work happens at the state and local level.”

In Massachusetts, the state Department of Public Health counted 1,974 estimated and confirmed overdose deaths in 2018.

The $350 million HEALing Communities Study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and National Institute on Drug Abuse. Grants were also awarded to Columbia University in New York City, The Ohio State University and the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Damian Archer, chief medical officer at NSCH, said they have the capacity to provide critical treatment services to those in need. “Anyone who needs care can have access to it,” he said.

“In many ways, we’re already doing some of the work that Boston Medical Center is looking to expand across the state,” Archer added.

Originally scheduled for early May, Boston Medical Center will soon randomize the selected 16 cities and towns across the state, labeling them as either control or intervention communities.

For three years, control communities will receive funds, training and technical assistance to implement or expand office-based addiction treatment that delivers medication for opioid use disorder in a primary care setting.

As for intervention communities, Archer said they’ll receive the same resources plus additional expert facilitation and funds for more comprehensive approaches to reduce deaths.

It’s yet to be seen what rolls out, Archer added.

When it comes to addiction, Archer said, “It’s difficult to use the word successful. But improving their physical health can be demonstrative.”

Staff writer Alyse Diamantides can be reached at 978-338-2660 or adiamantides@salemnews.com.

 

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NSCH Nurse Practitioner Receives Top Honor

NSCH Nurse Practitioner Receives Top Honor Allison Kilcoyne received the prestigious 2019 AANP State Award for Excellence.

By News Desk, News Partner |

From North Shore Community: North Shore Community Health’s Allison Kilcoyne, NP has been awarded the prestigious 2019 AANP State Award for Excellence. North Shore Community Health’s Director of School-Based Health, Allison Kilcoyne, NP has been awarded the prestigious 2019 AANP State Award for Excellence. The NP State Award for Excellence is granted annually to an individual NP in each state who has demonstrated excellence in clinical practice. Allison Kilcoyne will be honored during the 2019 AANP National Conference in Indianapolis in June. North Shore Community Health thanks Allison Kilcoyne for the level of dedication she demonstrates to community health and excellent care of her patients. Allison, as Director of School-Based Health, oversees and directs all NSCH school programs. Allison and our school-based teams are making a difference in young lives every day.

“Allison Kilcoyne is one of North Shore Community Health’s dedicated, compassionate and committed providers. Allison beneficially impacts the daily lives of all in her practice, she is a true asset to North Shore Community Health and we applaud her great accomplishment ,” said Maggie Brennan, President and CEO of North Shore Community Health. North Shore Community Health is a level 3 PCMH, is a Federally Qualified Community Health Center which has three family practice sites that include Salem Family Health Center, Peabody Family Health Center, and Gloucester Family Health Center. These sites have medical, dental and behavioral health services and serve individuals and families of all ages. NSCH has School-Based Health Centers at: Salem High School Teen Health Center, Peabody Veterans War Memorial High School Teen Health Center and behavioral health centers at Collins Middle School, Bates Elementary School, Bentley Academy Charter School, Horace Mann Laboratory School, and Peabody Learning Academy. No one seeking care at any of our sites will ever be denied access to services due to inability to pay. We offer a discounted/sliding fee scale based on family size and income. You may apply for a discount at the front desk when you arrive at any of our sites. We also offer translation services, outreach and enrollment services and health education. We are governed by a Board of Directors where more than 50% of the Governing Board are also patients. North Shore Community Health is a member of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and the National Association of Community Health Centers. If you would like more information about this, please contact Margaret Brennan, MPH email at margaret.brennan@nschi.org or Christina Aubin at christina.aubin@nschi.org

Image via North Shore Community Health

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Nurse practitioner Allison Kilcoyne, director of school-based health for North Shore Community Health, has been awarded the state Award of Excellence by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners

Nurse practitioner Allison Kilcoyne, director of school-based health for North Shore Community Health, has been awarded the state Award of Excellence by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, given for excellence in clinical practice. She will be honored during the AANP national conference in Indianapolis in June.

 

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Join our very own Dr. Archer for a screening of “Addiction”

Join our very own Dr. Archer for a screening of “Addiction” on March 5th

 

“Addiction,” a screening March 5, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Mosesian Center, 321 Arsenal St. Watertown. Wayside Youth & Family Support Network’s Multi-Service Center and PBS’ science series, NOVA, are holding a screening of the documentary, “Addiction.” The film takes a hard look at the science of addiction, and features firsthand accounts from individuals and families struggling with opioid addiction. A panel of local experts will be on hand to answer audience questions following the film, including Dr. Laura Kehoe, medical director, MGH Substance Use Disorder Bridge Clinic; Dr. Dara Arons, family physician, Charles River Community Health; Dr. Damian Archer, chief medical officer, North Shore Community Health Center, and Peter Airasian, co-founder, Watertown Overcoming Addiction. Free. Eventbrite RSVP: bit.ly/2UTpujx or contact Stephanie_Sunderland@waysideyouth.org.

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New England Health Centers Ramp Up Efforts, Provide Quality Healthcare To Trans Community

New England Health Centers Ramp Up Efforts, Provide Quality Healthcare To Trans Community

By: Michael Givens/TRT Assistant Editor

 

Excerpt:

With five sites across Peabody, Salem, and Gloucester, North Shore Community Health (NSCH) is ramping up its efforts to become a comprehensive healthcare facility, and that includes building its trans health program.

“As part of our mission to provide comprehensive primary health care to all of our patients, we decided to begin the important work of enhancing our transgender health services by giving dedicated training through the Fenway Institute to a team of primary care providers across all of our sites in Salem, Peabody and Gloucester as well as at the two high schools, Peabody Veteran Memorial High School and Salem High School, to competently address the specific needs of our current and future transgender patients,” said Damian Archer, chief medical officer at NSCH.

According to Archer, NSCH has completed two years of clinical training through Trans ECHO to prepare clinicians to serve trans patients and a curricula is being developed to train clinical and administrative staff to provide stigma-free and inclusive care to patients. NSCH even reached out to the LGBTQ community for mentorship and advice on how to best roll out the program and incorporate the training into its work.

Most notably, Archer said, “North Shore Community Health stands-out in the medical community of the North Shore as a federally qualified community health center because we are part of a movement to deliver social justice through the provision of equitable, high-quality health care.”

Perhaps NSCH’s work will signal healthcare best practices for the future, both locally and nationally.

For the full story please visit: New England Health Centers Ramp Up Efforts, Provide Quality Healthcare To Trans Community

Peabody High Class of ’14 supports Student Health Center

Peabody High Class of ’14 supports Student Health Center 

PEABODY —  The class of 2014 at Peabody High has donated $1,000 to the school’s Student Health Center, to support mental health services.

Matthew Mogavero, co-resident of the class, said in an email that the class did not make a gift at graduation, but recently made the decision to make one to the health center, which is open to students at the high school when school is in session.

The center, operated by North Shore Community Health, provides medical services such as immunizations, urgent care visits, physicals and sports physicals, as well as mental health services, including counseling, individual therapy, group therapy, help with stopping drug or alcohol use, and stress management.

“The class officers polled some members of our class, and the overwhelming consensus was that our peers wanted these funds to go toward mental health services at the high school,” Mogavero said . He said many recent graduates are alarmed about the rising rates of suicide and mental illness among young people in the United States.

“This gift has prompted conversations between us graduates of how we felt we had so little support in high school when it came to mental health and self-care,” he said. “The stigma of mental illness and lack of supportive resources has led to many youth suffering in silence. We must stop that stigma and inaction.”

The Student Health Center opened to treat students at Peabody High in the spring of 2015, after Mogavero’s class had graduated.

Staff writer Ethan Forman can be reached at 978-338-2673, by email at eforman@salemnews.com or on Twitter at @TannerSalemNews.

 

NORTH SHORE COMMUNITY HEALTH RECEIVES FEDERAL GRANT – Health Center will expand its substance abuse and behavioral health services.

 

North Shore Community Health receives federal grant.

Health Center will expand its substance abuse and behavioral health services.

Salem, MA, September 26, 2018North Shore Community Health received $371,000 in federal funding to expand its existing substance abuse and behavioral health treatment services. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) HRSA awarded $352 million to increase access to substance use disorder and mental health services through the Expanding Access to Quality Substance Use Disorder and Mental Health Services (SUD-MH) to 1,232 community health centers across the nation.

The awards support HHS’s Five-Point Opioid Strategy, which launched last year to empower local communities on the frontlines of the national epidemic. “HRSA is committed to fighting this crisis by supporting our grantees with resources, technical assistance, and training to integrate behavioral health care services into practice settings and communities,” said HRSA Administrator George Sigounas MS, Ph.D. “These funds enable HRSA grantees to continue to implement or expand substance use disorder and mental health services across the Nation.”

“Given that we are a medium size community health center; this is a very significant award. It affirms our commitment to participate in the efforts to combat the opioid abuse epidemic that is raging in the communities we serve,” said Margaret Brennan, CEO of North Shore Community Health. “We are currently seeing over 300 people who are struggling with substance abuse and the care we provide is very comprehensive. This funding will allow us to provide more care to those we are seeing now, expand to see new patients, and see more people who are struggling with behavioral health issues. With continuing support from the Federal Government and a new campaign we have launched to attract private giving, we are very proud of the success we have had over the last several years,” added Brennan.

North Shore Community Health is an NCQA certified Level 3 Patient Centered Medical Home with three family practice sites that include Salem, Peabody, and Gloucester Family Health Centers. These sites have medical, dental, substance abuse treatment, and behavioral health services and care for individuals and families of all ages. NSCH also has two School-Based Health Centers (Salem High School Teen Health Center and Peabody Veterans War Memorial High School Teen Health Center) and provides behavioral health care on site at Collins Middle School, Nathaniel Bowditch, Bates and Bentley Schools in Salem. No one seeking care at any of our sites will be denied access to services due to inability to pay as the health center uses a discounted/sliding fee scale based on family size and income. NSCH also provides translation services, outreach and enrollment services and health education. The health center is governed by a Board of Directors where more than 50% of the Board are also patients. North Shore Community Health is a member of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and the National Association of Community Health Centers.